14 Best Baseball Gloves That Will Go Light On Your Pocket

14 Best Baseball Gloves That Will Go Light On Your Pocket

Let’s start with a history lesson about who invented the game of baseball. Most will give credit to Abner Doubleday, dating back to the summer of 1839, but then, most would be wrong.

Alexander CartwrightA panel created in 1907 by A.G. Spalding, a former player and the same Spalding behind today’s well-known sporting goods company, was behind this history. Using the claims of a single man as validation, the legend of Doubleday was created. This legend was parlayed thirty years later into the creation of the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY, where the first baseball game was purported to have been played.

In reality, baseball is a mix of two English sports, cricket and rounders, each dating back to the 17th century and brought to America by British colonists. American baseball adopted some features from each of these two sports and was actually first played in 1845 by the New York Knickerbocker Baseball Club. A member of this club, Alexander Cartwright, is credited with codifying the rules of the game and is the true inventor of the sport.

Our Personal Best Choice

Best Budget Baseball Gloves Under $50

Best Overall

Rawlings Renegade

Best Honorable Mention

Mizuno Prospect

Best Budget Baseball Gloves Under $100

Best Overall

Rawlings R9 Youth Series

Best Honorable Mention

Wilson A1000

Best Value

Rawlings Sandlot

The rules established by Cartwright made the game a faster-paced sport and differentiated it from cricket. These rules, including three strikes you’re out, foul lines, a diamond-shaped infield, and tagging (rather than hitting the runner with the ball), the baserunner remain in effect today. The Knickerbockers played the first game under these changes against a cricket team in 1846, creating this uniquely American sport, which has now gained global popularity.

National LeagueBaseball continued to evolve and gain in popularity in the US. A group of eight teams banded together in 1877 and took over maintenance of the rule book, calling themselves the National League. This same National League still exists today and is known as the senior circuit.

American LeagueThe junior circuit, the American League, was also formed with eight teams, but not until 1901. The two leagues were not exactly amicable initially, with the older National League trying their best to push the upstart American League out of business. When it became apparent that was not going to happen, the two leagues signed the National Agreement, with the understanding that each would be considered a major league, and the champions of each of the two leagues would meet annually in a World Series.

In this article, we will be looking specifically at baseball gloves and will review fourteen different gloves priced under $100. But before beginning that review, let’s take some time to look back at the development of the baseball glove from the 1800s through today’s models.

The original baseball games were played bare-handed, and broken fingers and bruises were signs of manliness among the players. The first use of a glove is credited to Charles Waite in 1875. Waite’s glove was made out of a flesh-colored material, as he feared ridicule from wearing it should other players notice. It turns out he was right, but that didn’t stop the use of the glove.

Albert Goodwill SpaldingA.G. Spalding, mentioned earlier here, began to use a glove himself in 1877. Spalding also saw the commercial potential for baseball gloves and began making and selling them to others. In early glove developments, some padding was added, and webbing placed between the fingers of the gloves.

In 1895, the National League established rules about the maximum size and weight of baseball gloves.

The next significant glove development came in 1919 when a major league player asked Rawlings, an equipment manufacturer, to put a large web between the thumb and forefinger. With this simple change, the glove became a catching tool rather than a protection tool. You can see the development of the webbing in the second row of pictures below.

The 1950s brought deeper pockets and wide webbing, and also the development of position-specific gloves. These developments served to improve defensive quality during the games, as the fielding capabilities of the players improved dramatically.

Many of the gloves we will review here have variations available for pitchers, infielders, outfielders, and some for catchers and first baseman. Each glove has some specific nuances to make it more applicable to that position. A catcher’s glove will have much more padding than any other, while an outfielder’s glove will be longer than others, to provide just a little extra reach to help field that position. You can see the evolution of fielder’s gloves in the picture below:

Baseball Gloves Evolution

Baseball continues to change and evolve, but overall it is the same game played over a century ago. All ages and skill levels play baseball, from 5-year-olds learning the game via t-ball to major leaguers with unbelievable skills, making millions of dollars per year.

Learn how to play baseballBaseball is played globally, and has even been featured in the Olympics up until 1988, and will be revived in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. It has exceptional popularity in the countries of Latin and Central America, and these nations have sent hundreds of players to America to play in the major leagues. Even the Little League World Series features teams from around the globe, including Europe and Asia. It may be the national pastime in the US, but it truly is a global sport.

Comparison Table

In this review, we’re going to take a look at fourteen different baseball gloves, all with a price of under $100. Our focus will be on the more generic type gloves, rather than the specialty gloves designed for catchers and first basemen. We’ll start here with a high-level look at the fourteen gloves. We’ll present the data in tabular form, and list out some of the key features and specifications of those gloves.

The table will also include a quality rating and the number of reviews, taken from the Amazon web site, and pricing for the glove. Following this, we’ll outline some of the key features and specifications you should look for when choosing the right glove for you. Afterward, we’ll take an in-depth look at each glove, outlining our first impressions, features, and specs of the glove, and the pros and cons of that particular glove. Once that is complete, we will make some “best of” recommendations from the fourteen gloves.

We will try to standardize on the right-hand throw glove, as there may be some differences in prices between the two. There are also different size variations for many of these gloves, also with different prices. We will try to mention the glove size in the review to make sure that the information stays consistent from glove to glove.

Product Best Features Rating (Number of Reviews) Price Range View on Amazon

Rawlings Sandlot Baseball Glove Series

Rawlings Sandlot

  • 11-3/4” glove for infielder/pitcher,
  • broken in at factory,
  • extra padding for palm and fingers

4.7 out of 5
(102)

$60

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Wilson A1000 Baseball Glove Series

Wilson A1000

  • all leather shell, laces, and lining,
  • infielder’s glove,
  • 11.5”,
  • available in multiple colors and designs

4.6 out of 5
(71)

$97

Check Price

Rawlings Select Pro Lite Baseball Glove Series (Youth MLB Player Models)

Rawlings Select Pro Lite

  • 11-1/2” youth IF glove,
  • leather lacing and shell,
  • 90% broken in by factory

4.6 out of 5
(157)

$44

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Rawlings Renegade Baseball/Softball Glove Series

Rawlings Renegade

  • 12-1/2” utility glove for baseball or softball,
  • factory broken in,
  • cushioned palm and fingers

4.6 out of 5
(279)

$45

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Rawlings R9 Youth Baseball Glove Series

Rawlings R9 Baseball Glove

  • 11-1/2” youth pitcher/infielder glove,
  • leather shell,
  • taper fit for smaller hands,
  • reinforced palm and padded thumb

4.6 out of 5
(24)

$90

Check Price

Rawlings P115GBMT-6/0 Prodigy Youth Baseball Glove

Rawlings P115GBMT

  • 11-1/2” youth pitcher/infielder glove,
  • all leather,
  • taper fit for smaller hands,
  • factory broken in

4.5 out of 5
(65)

$35

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Mizuno Prospect PowerClose Youth Baseball Glove Series

Mizuno Prospect PowerClose

  • 11-1/2” youth pitcher/infielder utility glove,
  • absorbent lining,
  • Power Close technology

4.5 out of 5
(81)

$40

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Rawlings Player Preferred Adult Baseball/Softball Glove Series

Rawlings Player Preferred

  • 12-1/2” combination baseball or softball glove,
  • padded palm,
  • 80% factory break-in,
  • one-piece solid webbing

4.5 out of 5
(539)

$56

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Wilson A900 Baseball Glove Series

Wilson A900

  • 12” first baseman’s glove,
  • single post webbing,
  • Pedroia fit

4.5 out of 5
(163)

$64

Check Price

#Rawlings R9 Baseball Glove Series

Rawlings R9 Baseball Glove Series

  • 12” pitcher’s glove,
  • 2-piece solid webbing,
  • padded thumb, palm, fingers,
  • for 8-14-year-olds

4.5 out of 5
(42)

$81

Check Price

Louisville Slugger Genesis Baseball Glove Series

Louisville Slugger Genesis

  • 12” pitcher’s model,
  • closed webbing,
  • OF and IF models also available,
  • leather palm,
  • nylon shell

4.4 out of 5
(17)

$33

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Mizuno MVP Prime Youth Baseball Glove Series

Mizuno MVP Prime

  • 12” outfielder’s glove,
  • #4 bestseller for outfielders,
  • #16 for infielders,
  • pro-level lacing,
  • available multiple sizes and colors,
  • 1.3# weight

4.4 out of 5
(20)

$61

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Wilson A450 Baseball Glove Series

Wilson A450

  • dual post web,
  • 12” pitcher/infield/outfield glove,
  • five available designs

4.3 out of 5
(35)

$30

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Mizuno Franchise Baseball Glove Series

Mizuno Franchise

  • 12” pitcher’s glove,
  • solid webbing,
  • pre-oiled,
  • anti-moisture lining,
  • padded palm

4.0 out of 5
(21)

$75

Check Price

Buying Guide

The purpose of this section of the product review is to identify and define several key characteristics, features, and specifications relative to the gloves that are important to your buying decision. Many of these gloves will have the same general characteristics, such as size, but there will be other subtle differences between them.

We won’t go into great depth and detail here, but instead, give a short overview of each of the features we feel are critical to buying the best possible glove for your needs. This purchase should not be based solely on price, but rather on total value – that combination of price and features that gives you exactly the glove you need.

Player Position

Player Position

Many of these gloves are designed for specific baseball positions. These gloves will typically have subtle differences between them, to give specific advantages to the player in that position. The primary positions for which specialty gloves are designed are infield (first, second, and third base positions, plus shortstop), pitcher, outfield (left, right, and center fields), and catcher. Where the differences between gloves are relatively minor, you may see some combination gloves, such as infielder/pitcher. First base and catcher gloves are very specific and not interchangeable with other positions in most cases.

Catcher's mitt The catcher’s glove is typically circular and heavily padded to protect the hand. It has a hinged design, so the catcher can catch the pitch with the glove hand only and not involve his other hand (for safety reasons). The pocket is fairly shallow, as the catcher must have the ability to remove and throw the ball quickly in the event of a runner trying to steal a base.

First base gloveThe first baseman’s glove is somewhat similar to the catcher’s, in that it also has a lot of padding because of the number of throws to that position, and the demands on the glove hand. It is longer and designed to scoop up low or bouncing throws from the dirt easily. An example of a catcher’s mitt is on the left below; a picture of a first baseman’s glove is on the right.

Pitcher's gloveThe pitcher’s glove, infielder’s glove, and outfielder’s glove are overall very similar. The pitcher’s glove typically has a solid webbing (more on that later), primarily so that the batter cannot see his grip on the ball to know what pitch is coming.

The infielder’s glove is similar, but the webbing is not really an issue. For the infielder, the key is to be able to get the ball out of the glove and ready to throw quickly, so the pocket size and depth are important parameters. The open webbing will allow dirt to pass through the glove during fielding, and thereby not affect the grip or throw.

Outfielders gloveThe outfielder’s glove is typically an inch or two longer than the pitcher or infielder glove. This length gives him an ability to reach just a little further to catch the balls. The importance of this difference increases as the level of play and proficiency increases; it is not so important for youth gloves, and you often see infielder and outfielder gloves used interchangeably.

Type of Glove

Type of Glove

There are three standard variations of the game of baseball, each of which uses a different sized ball. This ball size, in turn, can affect the size and style of the glove used. The variations are:

  • fast-pitch softball, which uses an 11” circumference ball;

  • slow-pitch softball, which uses a 12” ball;

  • baseball, which uses a 9” ball.

Some gloves are manufactured specifically for one sport or the other; other gloves can be used in either of the applications, but perhaps not as efficiently. Most of the gloves discussed here are for baseball, but there are a couple of examples of combination gloves.

Size

Size

As noted in the position description above, many of these gloves are designed for a specific position on the diamond. However, even within those positions, there may be various sizes of gloves available. It would not be uncommon to see infielder’s gloves ranging from 11 – 12-1/2” sizes. Glove size is more a matter of personal preference, based on the player’s size and hand development, than a necessity for performance until you get to the highest levels of organized baseball.

Design and Color

Design and Color

This is totally a matter of personal preference, as neither the glove design nor color will affect performance. By design, we refer to the combination of colors used in webbing, lacing, padding, and the glove itself, not the actual functional design of the glove. You’ll find various shades of leather used, colored laces and stitching, and so on. Some design changes may carry a price premium over the standard model, while others will be the same.

Material

Material

The primary material for most of these gloves will be leather, usually cowhide or pigskin. Some gloves may also use man-made fibers, nylon, or materials other than leather for the laces, webs, palm supports, and so on. Most of these materials will have similar performance to leather and will be more prevalent on the lower end priced gloves than on the higher-priced equipment.

Weight

Weight

Most of the gloves in this review will weigh between one and two pounds. For adults, the weight of the glove is really a non-factor. It’s much more relevant for youth gloves, as the younger players may have difficulty maneuvering and closing a heavier glove than a lighter glove. A very stiff glove will also be difficult for them to use, as they may not have the hand strength to close the glove around the ball.

Padding

Padding

baseball glove paddingPadding in a baseball glove is directly proportional to comfort. We discussed the heavily padded catcher’s and first baseman’s gloves earlier, but some level of padding is also present in other style gloves. Most padding will be centered around the palm and webbing area of the glove, where the ball is meant to be caught. Additional padding in the fingers will also increase user comfort while catching and fielding.

Webbing

Webbing

baseball gloves webbingWebbing refers to the area of the glove between the thumb and forefinger. There are generally two different types of webbing used in baseball gloves – solid and posted. Solid webbing, as the name implies, has no openings in the webbing. Solid webbing is normally one-piece, but two-piece solid webbing is also common. Posted webbing consists of either a single or dual vertical post, supported by two or more horizontal posts. Pictures of each are below, with solid webbing on the left.

Pocket Depth

Pocket Depth

baseball gloves pocket depthThe pocket depth can be a primary consideration, especially for an infielder’s choice of the glove. Generally, middle infielders like shortstops and second basemen will prefer a glove with a shallower pocket depth. This allows them to quickly get the ball out of their glove and make the throw. As a general rule, they also prefer a single or double post glove, as on the right above. As they catch, this design allows any dirt to fall through the glove, and not affect their grip on the ball as they throw it.

Throw

Throw

right-hand throw or left-hand throwWe mentioned the throw earlier in the review, but let’s touch on it again here. Throw refers to which hand you will throw the ball with. This, unless you’re Jim Abbott or Pete Gray (Google it!), impacts which hand you will wear the glove on. If you see “right-hand throw” in the description, it means the glove is worn on the left hand, and the opposite for “left-hand throw”; glove worn on the right hand so you can throw with your left.

Stitching or Lacing

Stitching or Lacing

The stitching, also called lacing, on a baseball glove is what holds everything together. If you scroll up to the images above, you can see the stitching holding the tops of fingers of the glove together and in position, as well as closing the seam at the bottom of the glove after the padding has been inserted during manufacture. Stitching will normally be rawhide or leather, but in some cases, it may be from human-made fibers such as nylon.

Fit

Fit

Baseball glove fit is important to good performance. The glove should fit snugly but not too tight or too loose. Gloves will typically have an adjustment band to cross over the back of the wrist to hold the glove firmly in place during play. Fingers should fit into the glove normally, without undue extension or manipulation.

For youth gloves, and even for some adults with smaller hands, you may run across a reference to a “Pedroia Fit,” named after an ex-big-league player who was involved with the design. It features a smaller hand opening and narrower fingers to accommodate smaller hands.

Especially with younger players, there is a trade-off in fit when buying a glove. Ideally, you would like the glove a little larger, so that there is room for the player to grow into it, and use it for multiple seasons. However, if there is too much room to grow, you can end up with a sloppy fit, and poor performance in fielding. It’s best to find the middle ground between these two extremes.

Break-In

Break-In

When you buy a new baseball glove, sometimes the leather can be very stiff and difficult to close. A pocket for catching the ball may not be fully formed. If this is the case, some lengths of the break-in period will be required to make the glove efficient and fully usable. Break-ins can be as simple as a few hours of playing catch or tying a ball tightly in the pocket, or as complex as applying oil, pounding the glove with a mallet, or heating it.

Baseball glove brake inSome of the gloves featured here include breaking in as part of the manufacturing process, and come advertised as “90% ready for play”. In those cases, the glove should be close to ready to use, and maybe just a few games of catch are needed to finalize the break-in. In these cases, we suggest contacting the manufacturer’s web site or customer service department for their recommendations on how to finish the process. In any event, if the break-in process is not done completely and correctly, it can directly affect the performance of the glove and player.

Price

Price

While we are not looking at a huge range from the cheapest to most expensive gloves here, it’s just a fact that budget does enter into play sometimes. You can buy one of these gloves for as little as $30, while another is just under $100. They both catch a ball, so what is the reason to buy one over another? We like to think it is overall value; not just the price you pay, but that combination of price and features that give you exactly the baseball glove you want and need. A heavy, large, $100 glove probably does not make a lot of sense for a five-year-old just starting his first season of t-ball. Conversely, a high school level player probably needs something more than a $30 youth model. Finding that sweet spot between price and needs is value, and that should be your target.

So, that wraps up our review of features, specifications, and functional characteristics of the fourteen gloves. Let’s move on to the individual reviews.

Product Reviews – Best Baseball Gloves

Rawlings Sandlot Baseball Glove Series – Best Value

This glove is a combined infield/pitcher glove, and the Sandlot series also has gloves available for the other positions; first base, outfield, and catcher. Rawlings has a glove-making history that goes back to the 1920s, and this series is a fine continuation of that history. It’s built for comfort with palm pads and finger padding and comes ready to play with a 90% factory break-in.

Rawlings Sandlot

Baseball Glove Series

Features and specifications:

- 11-3/4” model, with contrasting brown leather and a black webbing

- leather is oiled to give a vintage look to the glove

- primarily an adult glove, but can be worn by older youths

- single post, stitched web design

Check Price!

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Pros
  • #6 best seller in infield gloves at Amazon
  • Suitable for baseball and softball
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Cons
  • Users complain it is not 90% broken in; especially not loose enough for younger players who don’t have the hand strength to close the glove as received

Wilson A1000 Baseball Glove Series – Honorable Mention

Wilson Sporting Goods makes a large variety of sporting equipment, and made their first baseball glove in 1922. The featured glove is an 11-1/2” pitcher’s or infielder’s glove, with a pro-laced solid webbing. The glove is black and gray leather, with red stitching for contrast. For gloves under $100, this is the upper end of the Wilson line and is priced just under $100.

Wilson A1000

Baseball Glove

Series

Features and specifications:

- gloves are optimized during production for faster break-in periods

- although not clearly marked as such, this is a youth or small adult model glove

- requires good break-in due to solid padding and stiff leather

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Very solid 4.7 review, well recognized as a very good older youth glove
  • Designed for pitcher or infielder, well reviewed by both
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Cons
  • Advertising is not clear about glove size/use – several adult complaints about glove being too small
  • Highest price of all the gloves on this list

Rawlings Select Pro Lite Youth Baseball Glove Series

This is our second visit to the Rawlings line, and won’t be the last. The featured glove is an 11-1/2” Kris Bryant infielder’s glove, modeled after the one used by this all-star player. Like other Rawlings’ gloves, it advertises as 90% broken in at the factory. It’s designed to give younger players a secure fit while wearing the glove.

Rawlings Select Pro

Lite Youth Baseball

Glove Series

Features and specifications:

- available in sizes from 9-1/2” to 12”

- two-post, “H” style webbing

- taper fit with smaller hand opening for greater control by younger players

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Nice introductory glove, #5 seller on Amazon, budget price
  • Rated highly for value, comfort, and durability, and 4.6 overall rating on almost 50 reviews
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Cons
  • Gloves seem to run smaller than those of other manufacturers
  • Complaints about quality of laces, consistency of factory break-in

Rawlings Renegade Baseball/Softball Glove Series– Best Overall (Under $50)

This adult-sized glove is designed and marketed as a combination baseball and softball glove. This featured 12-1/2” model has a large, neo-flex pocket to accommodate either sized ball. It has the standard Rawlings 90% break-in, and comes highly rated on over 270 reviews.

Rawlings Renegade

Baseball/Softball

Glove Series

Features and specifications:

- high density cushioning for palm and finger padding

- lightweight mesh back design, solid webbing

- velcro straps for secure, adjustable fit

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Overall 4.6 rating, with 4.8 rating for value, and 4.6 for durability and comfort
  • Flexible for use in both baseball and softball without performance issues for either
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Cons
  • Despite good ratings for durability, contradictory reviews about quality and durability of mesh backing

Rawlings R9 Youth Baseball Glove Series – Best Overall

Patterned after professional designs, this 11-1/2” pitcher/infielder glove has an all-leather content. It’s an attractive black leather with red lacing and highlights. Designed for an easy break-in, it’s well-padded for comfort, and “out of the box” ready to use.

Rawlings R9

Youth Baseball

Glove Series

Features and specifications:

- pro-style tapered fit and lowered finger slots for smaller hands

- reinforced palm and thumb, well-padded for comfort

- higher end of the price scale, but well rated for performance

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Over 90% of customer reviews are 5-star (23 reviews)
  • Reasonably easy break-in for users
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Cons
  • High price point at $90
  • Limited number of reviews

Rawlings P115GBMT-6/0 Prodigy Youth Baseball Glove

This is another youth glove from Rawlings, an 11-1/2” combination pitcher/infielder glove. As with the other gloves from them, this one is game ready from the Rawlings factory. It has a Trap-Eze web, and comes in brown, black, and tan leathers.

Rawlings P115GBMT-6/0

Prodigy Youth

Baseball Glove

Features and specifications:

- youth taper fit for smaller hands, has lowered finger slots and smaller hand opening

- extra palm and index finger padding

- single post Trap-Eze web, ideal for pitchers and middle infielders

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Budget-priced at $35, solid rating at 4.5
  • Lightweight at 14 ounces, perfect for smaller hands and growing youths
  • Highly rated for comfort and value
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Cons
  • Lower star (one- and two-star) customer reviews reference that low-quality leather is used for this glove

Mizuno Prospect PowerClose Youth Baseball Glove Series – Best Honorable Mention (Under $50)

We go back to the Mizuno line for this 11.5” youth utility glove. It comes in soft, brown leather, and has PowerClose features to make the glove easier to close for smaller hands. It’s recommended for recreational and t-ball use and is a good glove for those just learning the game. Very lightweight at under 13 ounces, it’s sized perfectly for the youngest players.

Mizuno Prospect

Power Close Youth

Baseball Glove Series

Features and specifications:

- PowerClose technology helps teach players to catch the ball in the pocket and closes glove easier

- polyurethane palm lining for extra padding and comfort

- full-grain pig leather, with special lining to disperse perspiration

- solid web design

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Specifically designed to help teach good baseball habits at a young age
  • #1 Amazon bestseller in infield gloves
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Cons
  • Sizes apparently run smaller than competitive gloves so might not be a one to one replacement
  • Several complaints about laces giving out too quickly and breaking

Rawlings Player Preferred Adult Baseball/Softball Glove Series

This combination baseball and softball glove is designed for adult use and is 12-1/2” size. A large basket web, fully solid, makes this glove suitable for playing pretty much any position in the field other than first base or catcher. It is almost fully broken in, and can be easily finished and ready for play in a very short time. It has a mid-range price at $56 and a good 4.5 rating.

Rawlings Player Preferred

Adult Baseball/Softball

Glove Series

Features and specifications:

- glove features a special Velcro loop closure for an adjustable, tight fit

- “Zero Shock” palm padding for extra comfort while catching

- pre-oiled, 80% broken in, full-grain leather for durability and strength

Check Price!

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Pros
  • #3 best seller in baseball mitts at Amazon
  • Highly rated for comfort, value, and durability (4.6 for each)
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Cons
  • Many comments that glove sizes run too small
  • Complaints about laces breaking with limited use of glove

Wilson A900 Baseball Glove Series

This Wilson model is a 12” first baseman’s glove, the first of this type we have reviewed. It features a very large, single post web with a triple crossbar, and comes in dark brown leather with white trim. It’s a full leather glove, sized for youth or adults with small hands, and comes with a low heel for improved feeling on bouncing or short-hopped throws.

Wilson A900

Baseball Glove Series

Features and specifications:

- double palm construction, to provide improved stability in the pocket

- web is supported by all-leather laces

- low profile heel gives added flexibility to glove, opens up palm and pocket for improved fielding skills

- models in this series also available for infield/pitcher, catcher, and outfield

Check Price!

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Pros
  • 4.5 rating; $62 price is mid-range
  • This series is one of the higher quality Wilson gloves, below the A1000 reviewed earlier (A2000 the highest)
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Cons
  • Complaints about leather and stitching quality
  • Difficult to break-in

Rawlings R9 Baseball Glove Series

This is another glove from the R9 series. In this case, the model is a combination pitcher/infielder glove, featuring a two-piece solid webbing, in black and brown leather, with red trim. It’s geared for the most talented players in the 8-14-year-old range. With many pro-like features, it’s an upper-end glove for the upper-end player.

Rawlings R9

Youth Baseball

Glove Series

Features and specifications:

- 80% break-in from the factory, allowing it to be custom fit to your hand when the break-in is completed

- padded thumb, reinforced palm, and lined finger slots for a comfortable feel

- marketed as a training glove to improve infielder hand speed and ball transfer

Check Price!

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Pros
  • 88% 4- and 5-star reviews, overall 4.5 rating
  • Very few low ratings; only one 1-star review which complained about sizing
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Cons
  • Price point is fairly high at $81

Louisville Slugger Genesis Baseball Glove Series

While better known for their bats, this 12” pitcher’s glove comes from the Louisville Slugger line. It’s a youth glove, designed for younger players. It’s made from both leather and nylon, and features an easy-closing pocket which is useful in teaching younger players to catch.

Louisville Slugger

Genesis Baseball

Glove Series

Features and specifications:

- glove is gray, black, and white, with a closed web design

- palm and web are leather, shell is nylon

- mesh construction makes the glove easier to close

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Good introductory glove for new players, especially younger ones
  • Affordable at $33
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Cons
  • Rating is based on only 13 reviews; could not find reviews on other sites

Mizuno MVP Prime Youth Baseball Glove Series

Mizuno also has a long history of making baseball gloves, dating back to 1913. The featured glove is an older-youth glove designed for pitchers. It has a tapered fit and lower finger slots manufactured specifically for smaller hands. It’s a good-looking, black leather glove, with solid webbing and an embroidered logo. It does require some level of break-in prior to use.

Mizuno MVP

Prime Youth

Baseball Glove Series

Features and specifications:

- 12” model is featured, center pocket design, regular depth

- available in sizes from 11” to 12-3/4”

- glove weight is 1.25 pounds, so not made for smaller or younger players

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Pros
  • Strong, durable pro-style lacing
  • Extra padding in thumb slot
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Cons
  • Only 15 reviews on Amazon

Wilson A450 Youth Baseball Glove Series

This utility glove comes from the Wilson 450 line, aimed at the younger and newer players. Based on reviews, the glove is best sized for players ten and under. This model is a combined infield/outfield glove, but could also be used as a pitcher’s glove. It’s made of black pigskin leather with blonde trim to give it a professional player look.

Wilson A450

Youth Baseball

Glove Series

Features and specifications:

- 12” combination or utility glove, meant as an introductory glove for younger players

- weight is 14-ounces, so easy for younger players to position and move the glove

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Pros
  • By most accounts, easy to break-in
  • Lowest price glove on this list
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Cons
  • Second lowest-rated glove
  • Complaints about overly stiff, even after breaking the glove in

Mizuno Franchise Baseball Glove Series

This 11.5” utility glove is designed for infielders, outfielders, or pitchers, with a regular pocket depth. It is available in a variety of sizes from 11-1/2” to 12.5”, and the series is also available in a catcher’s model. It features a single bar webbing and uses a pre-oiled Java oil for “out of the box” use with just a little additional break-in.

Mizuno Franchise

Baseball Glove Series

Features and specifications:

- comes with a Parashock Plus palm pad to reduce impact and sting while catching the ball

- special lacing pattern for improved flexibility without sacrificing shape and durability

- black leather, gray trim, with Deep III Web design

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Pros
  • Needs to be broken in, but gets good reviews after process is completed
  • Fairly light, at just under one pound, making it also suitable for older youths
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Cons
  • Fairly stiff on delivery, and required extended break-in period
  • Comments that glove sizes run consistently small
  • Lowest rating, only 21 reviews, upper end priced

Conclusion

Earlier in this article, we promised to share our thoughts on some “best of” gloves from this list of fourteen gloves. As I went through this, it became apparent to me that, in judging these gloves, they probably needed to be divided into a couple of sub-categories. Given that, and a top-end price of $100, here are my proposals for Best Overall, Best Value, and Best Budget (under $50) Baseball Gloves. Even though we’ve tagged them through the course of this review, let’s summarize them here so everything is in one place.

Best Baseball Gloves Under $50

Even though Rawlings Renegade qualifies as “budget,” it’s not fair to compare the features of a $30 glove against a $90 glove. So, admittedly somewhat arbitrarily, I’ve added this category to the “best of” list. Flip a coin when it comes to this Rawlings baseball glove. It comes in with the 4.6 ratings and has a significant number of reviews. The overall consistency of the Rawlings glove makes it the right choice. Take your pick and claim your win!.

The  Mizuno Prospect is the #1 bestseller on Amazon, and a very solid, well-featured beginner’s glove. It has a low $39 selling price but still manages to pull off a solid 4.5 quality rating. The differentiator between this glove and the two Rawlings gloves above is the growth capability. This Mizuno is most likely a great first glove, but I don’t see the glove growing along with the player and his skill set. I don’t see this like a glove someone will use for multiple years, where I do think the Rawlings above will have superior longevity and will grow with the player. This is not a negative factor for the Mizuno, as it is designed as a beginner’s glove, but it is an advantage for the Rawlings.

Best Overall

Rawlings Renegade

Best Honorable Mention

Mizuno Prospect

Best Baseball Gloves Under $100

The best overall rating goes to the Rawlings R9 series of gloves. We had two different gloves from this grouping on our list. Even though both of these gloves are at the high end of the price scale, they offer great features, exceptional quality, and solid reviews from their customers. Throw in the history and dedication to the sport of the manufacturer, and you have an unbeatable combination.

The Wilson A1000 glove represents the top end of these gloves priced under $100. It was very tough to make a pick for or against this one as it compares favorably to the Rawlings line, and honestly, you won’t go wrong with any of these gloves as Best Overall. The extra break-in time compared to the Rawlings glove, and the poor marketing and descriptors dropped this one down a notch from the R9 models.

With value defined as the right combination of price and features, the only decision point here was whether to go with the Sandlot style or to choose the Player Preferred. Both offer the same consistency in quality and style associated with the Rawlings line. The Player Preferred had a slightly lower rating but is still the #3 selling glove on Amazon. It has over 500 customer reviews, so something must be going right with this line of gloves. But in the end, the 4.7 ratings of The Sandlot, with a $60 price, and a #6 bestseller, made this my Best Value glove.

Back to the Wilson line for another honorable mention with the A900. This is the next level of quality down from the A1000 but nevertheless comes with solid reviews from over 150 customers and a mid-range $62 price tag. Even though some of the complaints about the quality of the stitching and leather made me a bit nervous, I don’t think you could go wrong with this glove.

Best Overall

Rawlings R9 Youth Series

Best Honorable Mention

Wilson A1000

Best Value

Rawlings Sandlot

So, this concludes the review of our fourteen best baseball gloves under $100. Given the way the results turned out, I feel the need to point out that I am a freelance writer and reviewer, and do not work directly for Rawlings or the blog owner. It’s just the way things evolved after reviewing each and every one of these gloves in full detail. That being said, I don’t think that there are any bad gloves in this entire list; some just meet the needs and purposes better than others.

We hope this article helps assist you in finding the best glove under $100 based on your skill level, playing needs, and budget. The attached links, plus the manufacturer’s and other web sites, can give you more detailed information that could not be summarized here. Play ball!

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